I will be sharing thoughts here, every now and then, the only virtual food I can provide!

Being a private chef

There are significant differences in the profession of a restaurant chef and a private chef.

Restaurant chefs have to:

  1. Strictly follow health and safety protocols in order to protect the health of their clients.

  2. Set a menu that clearly communicates that restaurant’s identity.

  3. Reproduce the menu, or at the very least the identity, consistently, so that, on the fortunate occasion of a returning customer there will be no unpleasant surprises.

In that turf, the chef can then hold the ground with customers who will, for example, expect numerous vegan options at a grill house, or a steak at a fish tavern. He/she can politely show them the door to one of the endless other restaurants that can surely satisfy their needs, and go back to representing that restaurant’s specific menu to those happy returning customers, or to new adventurers, aspiring to retain them.

In homes, however, private chefs are not on their turf. A big part of the job is to adjust to the specific household. Of course, anyone should realize that skill full techniques, like sushi making, is not something that can be mastered quickly. So, a chef not trained in sushi, will not be able to deliver it to an acceptable quality, and a French trained chef should not be expected to suddenly cook great Thai. I do believe however private chefs should:

  1. Strictly follow health and safety protocols in order to protect the health of the household.

  2. Clearly communicate to the client their cooking style and be honest about their capabilities.

  3. Try to meet the household’s requests to the best of their ability and take on any challenge to evolve.

 

So, my advice to aspiring private chefs is to look everything up on google. If it is pies they want, learn how to make a good phyllo. First time might be a mess, second will be better, eventually you will get there, and through this process the most benefited person will be you.